Improving Relationships… Between Rooms That Is

inside designBy Karen Weiner-Mayar, owner of Idealspace Design

Improving Relationships… Between Rooms That Is

The most important interior design element of any home is the layout of the rooms and spaces. The way the various rooms and spaces relate to each other is often among the features that attract us enough to purchase our homes in the first place. Changing the layout can involve major renovations, but there are some basic ways to improve upon the perceived relationships between rooms or spaces without having to embark on any structural work.

Common complaints that homeowners tend to have about the layout of their homes include:

■ Adjoining rooms feel as though there is no “flow” between them.
■ There is no evident delineation between usable space and walking space in open-concept layouts.
■ Adjoining rooms require different atmospheres but their proximity makes this difficult.
■ Open-concept layouts provide no privacy or separation (visual, audible, etc.) within the space.
■ Lack of continuity between the various rooms.

way..   These issues can be compensated for simply by how the space is treated both in terms of furnish ings and décor. Solutions to the complaints listed above can be done in the matter of a couple of days without requiring the dust, debris and chaos that can accompany a major renovation project.

To create a sense of flow between rooms that are adjoining without being fully open to each other, make sure to use the same colournotescheme in both rooms, repeat various materials in both (i.e. if you have a leather sofa in one, have something with the same colour leather in the other), and strategically place mirrors to visually bring one room into the next. The mirrors will not only emphasize the relationship between the two spaces, but they will also reflect light making both rooms feel brighter and larger.

In open-concept floor plans it can be challenging to properly establish walking space (an unofficial hallway, if you will) separate from entertaining areas especially if you tend to entertain more than a few people at a time. Space can be separated visually without actually requiring obstructionstable such as walls. Emphasize your enter taining zones by having the brighter lights   focused at the seating areas, such as over the dining table, by the sofas, and at the kitchen’s work and seating zones; this will automatically create spaces with less light and people naturally migrate toward brighter lit areas, leaving the dimmer areas as passageways. Other tricks include an abrupt change in colour or ceiling height to create the sense that one space is ending and another starting.

Adjoining rooms requiring different atmospheres tend to work best by simply using the reversed colour scheme in one of the rooms. For instance, if one of the rooms is blue with beige and grey accents, in the other room you can use the beige as the main colour and the blue and grey as accents. This keeps a nice continuity while emphasizing difference.

Open-concept floor plans leaving you with a lack of separation have to be treated with great care. Take care with your furniture layout to create individual zones within the space, leaving ample room between.
If needed, back-to-back tall furniture pieces can create a physical division between “rooms”. If sound carries through very easily, add soft furnishings and accessories, such as a tapestry or fabric art instead of paintings, rugs, pillows or cushions on hard furniture, and so on. Soft items absorb sound, while hard surfaces reflect sound.

Creating a sense of continuity through a home is easier. Choose your favorites and don’t worry about over-using them! If your favorite colour is red, don’t be shy to use it in varying quantities in almost every room – from two walls in one room, to a simple splash in the next, to the colour of the furniture in the next… The same should be done with favorite materials too, such as wrought iron, dark stained ash wood,textured glass… Your favorite colours teamed up with your favorite materials only need some  neutral and contrasting basics to create a finished look that flows nicely without being too repetitive.

Ideal
To get more information regarding Real Estate Integrated Marketing system please review www.hlmt.ca, or/and H&L Facebook, or/and H&L Twitter or/and H&L LinkedIn
Terms of Use:
Articles are provided free of charge. Credit of usage must be attributed to Homes And Land Demeurea & Domaines .Any source/sponsor of the information quoted in the text must also be identified as presented. Images are only to be used with corresponding editorial copy. Usage of Homes and Land of Montreal articles constitutes your acceptance of these terms and an agreement between you and Homes and Land of Montreal.
Advertisement

Camera buying guide for Realtors.

1  [HLMT.caSO YOU’VE GOT THE LISTING, EVERYONE IS EXCITED, YOU HOLD UP YOUR CAMERA AND “CLICK,” THE SHUTTER FALLS. For better or for worse, your listing will be marketed based on the pictures you take. So, what kind of camera should you use? Is there a spacial model or special features that’ll help you as a Realtor? Here are a few simple guidelines to help you find the right camera to shoot your listings.
To begin, no camera’s perfect. Each one will have it’s advantages and shortcomings. Some people are loyal to a brands like Nikon or Cannon, but don’t let that distract you from all the other great companies out there, some of them creating truly innovative products cheaper than the leading brands. Over the years I’ve used Fuji and Casio, and today I shoot Sony.
So what should you look for in a camera?One of the most important things you’re going to need as a realtor is a camera and lens combination that can achieve wide angle shots. If you buy a camera with interchangeable lenses, then you’ll need to buy a wide angle lens, but if you buy a camera with a fixed lens, you must make absolutely sure it shoots wide enough to be useful to you.

The above picture shows what various lenses will capture. The wideness of a lens is called it’s focal length, wide focal lengths are denoted by small numbers like 14mm. The wider the angle of your lens (meaning the smaller the number), the more real estate you’ll be able to capture. This is especially useful for tight spaces like bathrooms. Some small cameras come with lenses wide enough to do the job. For example, if you cruise over to Lozeau.com, you’ll find the Olympus E-PM1. This camera is reasonably priced at under $500, and comes with a 14-42mm lens, a well-balanced choice for Realtors. However, remember to use your widest angle sparsely as it will introduce distortion around the edges of your images and can sometimes make rooms look like they’re uneven or buildings look like they’re about to fall over. (You can correct this somewhat in software which I’ll write about another time.)

2

Secondly, check to see if your camera allows you to overlay a grid while your taking a picture. The logic behind this is timeless, and is based on what’s known as the rule of thirds. Basically, it states that the interesting part of a picture should be laid out where the grid lines intersect because when viewing images, peoples’ eyes naturally gravitate to one of the intersecting points rather than the center of the image. Also, using these points is an easy way to create balance, flow and originality. I use guides religiously to line up important features of properties in interesting and engaging ways.

Lastly, if you’re camera is a few years old, it might be a great time to get a new one. In recent years digital cameras have seen tremendous improvements and now rival and in many cases surpass traditional film cameras. Companies compete ferociously to develop new features, better sensors and higher quality images resulting in dramatic gains for consumers.

If you’d like more advice or want to hire a professional photographer, please head over to my site at
http://www.silverlithomes.com

To get more information regarding Real Estate Integrated Marketing system please review www.hlmt.ca, or/and H&L Facebookor/and H&L Twitter or/and H&L LinkedIn
Terms of Use:
Articles are provided free of charge. Credit of usage must be attributed to Homes And Land Demeurea & Domaines .Any source/sponsor of the information quoted in the text must also be identified as presented. Images are only to be used with corresponding editorial copy. Usage of Homes and Land of Montreal articles constitutes your acceptance of these terms and an agreement between you and Homes and Land of Montreal.

DIAPASON

by

 By Danielle Voisard, Designer D’interieur

 [HLMT.ca] TELLES DES PRÉVISIONS MÉTÉOROLOGIQUES QUI FERONT LA PLUIE ET LE BEAU TEMPS DANS LE MONDE DU DESIGN ET DE LA DÉCORATION, VOICI LES TENDANCES 2012-2013.

Après avoir observé le climat et les valeurs, les attitudes comportementales mondiales, les météorologues du design s’entendent, 3 années à l’avance, sur des harmonies de couleurs et textures qui seront exploitées dans les différents marchés de consommation afin d’en faciliter les accords. C’est pourquoi, année après année, les palettes subissent de nouvelles orientations et au bout de 5 ans, un écart se fait sentir et les décors ont besoin d’être remis au « goût du jour ».

Pour 2012 la couleur vedette consacrée par le «Color Marketing Group» est la couleur qui porte le nomgénérique Pantone de ‘Tangerine-Tango’. Comme son nom l’indique, il s’agit d’un rouge vif pimenté d’orangé. Une couleur stimulante, radiante ! Cette couleur vive est soutenue par des tons neutres chauds qui peuvent en exalter la sensualité; d’un autre côté, on peut en exalter le dynamisme s’ils sont plutôt clairs et lumineux.

La couleur forte tendance annoncée pour 2013 est une teinte de violet profond rappelant la rose de couleur lie de vin, qualifié de couleur « androgyne » car elle plaira aux personnalités fortes. Lorsque juxtaposées, le rouge orangé et le violet profond, créent un effet clair-obscur sophistiqué et riche en vitalité.

Les décors pourront évidemment se décliner dans d’autres couleurs telles que des dorés très lumineux, accompagnés de blancs doux et crémeux, des verts jaunâtre grisés rappelant les artichauts ou les sous-bois, des bleus aux accents de turquoises dans tous les dégradés, des couleurs de terre rappelant la poterie. Toutes ces familles de couleurs sont invitées à la fête !

Le mélange des genres est toujours un heureux succès pour personnaliser un décor et il est de bon ton de rechercher des éléments, des accessoires, des textures ou des motifs de facture artisanale; l’attitude responsable nous pousse à redonner vie à des meubles qu’on a tant aimé mais qui ont besoin d’un nouvel élan d’amour : un geste en soi écologique bien actuel. Les métaux se réchaufferont et les bronzes, laitons antiques, cuivres retrouveront leurs lettres de noblesses.

Le fait est que pour réussir une harmonisation chromatique, il est primordial de tenir en compte des éléments existants à conserver ainsi que les incontournables, notamment les essences de bois, l’ensoleillement de la pièce, le rapport des pièces entre elles, leur volume… sans omettre le style de l’occupant, son art de vivre, et tous les facteurs humains qui peuvent influencer les choix…

Vous désirez actualiser votre décor pour stimuler la vente de votre résidence ou tout simplement pour vous-même : Diapason-Design d’Intérieur saura vous satisfaire quel que soit votre objectif !

blog

« POUR RÉUSSIR UNE HARMONISATION CHROMATIQUE, IL EST PRIMORDIAL DE TENIR EN COMPTE DES ÉLÉMENTS EXISTANTS À CONSERVER AINSI QUE LES INCONTOURNABLES. »

blogs

To get more information regarding Real Estate Integrated Marketing system please review www.hlmt.ca, or/and H&L Facebookor/and H&L Twitter or/and H&L LinkedIn
Terms of Use:
Articles are provided free of charge. Credit of usage must be attributed to Homes And Land Demeurea & Domaines .Any source/sponsor of the information quoted in the text must also be identified as presented. Images are only to be used with corresponding editorial copy. Usage of Homes and Land of Montreal articles constitutes your acceptance of these terms and an agreement between you and Homes and Land of Montreal.

 

Planning the ideal kitchen layout

new design

By Karen Weiner-Mayar, owner of Idealspace Design

[HLMT.ca] Redesigning and renovating a kitchen is the most trying home improvement project for most homeowners. Aside from having to survive a minimum of two weeks with no kitchen, each decision to be made can affect both the function and aesthetics of the room. Added to that is the fact that the kitchen is the most expensive renovation most homes will ever face, so doing it right the first time is a definite must. We all use our kitchens differently and that is why we can often see a beautiful kitchen and think to ourselves, without knowing exactly why, that it isn’t quite right.

YOUR IDEAL KITCHEN SHOULD CONSIDER:

Your shopping habits – Do you buy in bulk or only purchase things as you need them?
Your cooking habits – Do you routinely prepare home-made meals or are frozen foods and reheated take-out more your style? Are you an avid baker?
Your handedness and height – Are you a lefty or a righty? Are you considerably taller than, or shorter than, the average?
Your household – How many cooks use the kitchen? Are there teens or children who prepare their own snacks?
Your space – Is the kitchen used for eating meals or is all eating done in the dining room? Does the kitchen double as a homework area or for any other task?
Special needs – Should your kitchen be child-safe or suitable for someone with physical limitations or disabilities? Do you require a kosher kitchen?

The first step in kitchen planning is to determine where your major appliances will be located.article 7a

■ From there, you can determine if an extra-wide refrigerator is possible, or if you will have space for the wine fridge you have been wanting.

■ If an island is a desired feature, make sure you will have at least 36-inches between it and the cabinets. All islands must be carefully planned as they can be either a wonderful amenity or little more than a cause of bruised hips and frustrations.

■ Try to map out where you will store things, keeping everyday dishes and gadgets within arm’s reach, and banishing the least frequently used items to the least desirable locations – usually the back of the cabinet above the refrigerator. By determining what will go where, you can determine early on if you can make do with four drawers or if eight drawers would better suit your needs. Consider items like countertop appliances, cook books, that won’t reside in open view, and the basics that seem to migrate into every kitchen.

■ The microwave should be located where it will be most practical, so be honest with yourself (and your designer) about how you use it. Is it just for heating coffee or do you often use it for food preparation? The same advice should be followed for other small appliances that remain visible too.

Lighting in the kitchen is something too often overlooked. 

People presume that enough lighting equates good lighting, but the truth is that every fixture style and every bulb type gives a slightly different coloration to the light; a pink undertone from the lighting can cause meats to look undercooked and greens to look a bit on the brown side. Likewise, light with a yellow or blue undertone will cause certain foods to not look their best. The kitchen serves many functions, and each requires its own lighting: task lighting should be installed to serve the food preparation area and the sink; general light should provide even illumination to the whole kitchen; and ambient light allows you to highlight decorative objects, or just offers a nice soft glow so the room is not in total darkness. The ability to control the lighting is important, as all the lights are rarely needed at the same time; multiple switches and dimmers are recommended.

article 7Once you have the functional elements of your kitchen planned properly, any décor style that you introduce will be able to be implemented simply with your choices of colours, materials, and accessories. Because the kitchen is a busy space to begin with, minimal décor is required beyond the selection of materials and colours for cabinets, countertops and window treatments; often one theme for countertop accessories, one piece of art, very little else is required to add the finishing touches to a kitchen’s décor.

To get more information regarding Real Estate Integrated Marketing system please review www.hlmt.ca, or/and H&L Facebook, or/and H&L Twitter or/and H&L LinkedIn
Terms of Use:
Articles are provided free of charge. Credit of usage must be attributed to Homes And Land Demeurea & Domaines .Any source/sponsor of the information quoted in the text must also be identified as presented. Images are only to be used with corresponding editorial copy. Usage of Homes and Land of Montreal articles constitutes your acceptance of these terms and an agreement between you and Homes and Land of Montreal.
 

Light Up Your Life

With daylight hours getting shorter, now is a good time to think about improving lighting in your home. Functional and decorative, changing or adding a light new design2fixture can have a big impact on a room. But don’t make the too-common mistake of buying a light for its looks only. A black silk shade or an amber glass may look great, but will the light be what you need or expect? When choosing light fixtures look at the following:

■ Bulbs Type and quantity that the fixture uses, and total wattage of the bulbs.

■ Directionality Does the fixture provide up-light, down-light, spot light…

■ Intended use and functionality Ensure that you aren’t trying to use a task light as a general light.

■ Shade Although shades are often the most decorative part of a fixture, make sure that your choice won’t cast strange coloured light or impede the light from the fixture from actually lighting up your room.

■ Flexibility Can the fixture work on a dimmer? Will it be easy to match or coordinate with other lights in the room?

■ Overall quality Not always easy to determine, but look at the weight of the fixture, the price, warranty, sales person’s advice, and even on-line reviews about the fixture or manufacturer.

A professionally designed space will have a lot of lighting, or at least a lot of fixtures, in order to provide general, task, focal and ambient light. If you grew up in a home similar to my childhood home, each room had one overhead light and maybe a small reading lamp. But to correctly use light to enhance your space and reduce eye strain no matter the task being done, a number of fixtures and light sources are required.

Just how much light is right? Three fixture types, at the least, are required for each room: general, ambient and task, and many rooms require more than one task light. As long as each light can be operated independently and dimmers are installed wherever possible, it is quite difficult to over-light a space.

new designBY KAREN WEINER-MAYAR,
OWNER OF IDEALSPACE DESIGN

To get more information regarding Real Estate Integrated Marketing system please review www.hlmt.ca, or/and H&L Facebook, or/and H&L Twitter or/and H&L LinkedIn
Terms of Use:
Articles are provided free of charge. Credit of usage must be attributed to Homes And Land Demeurea & Domaines .Any source/sponsor of the information quoted in the text must also be identified as presented. Images are only to be used with corresponding editorial copy. Usage of Homes and Land of Montreal articles constitutes your acceptance of these terms and an agreement between you and Homes and Land of Montreal.